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business globally. when it does come to foreign policy, many of the public top goals are driven by domestic concerns. you can take that top concern and drill down a bit further. 50% of americans say the use of military drones make the u.s. safer from terrorism compared to only 31% who say the war in afghanistan has. surprise that most americans want the country to be the only military superpower. and more seat time -- see china as number one in economic straight -- in economic strength. while we are in asia, look at something else. more young americans think that region has greater importance for the europe -- for the u.s. than europe does, but not so for older americans. but in terms of america to other countries, this has not changed much overall. the pew research study chose 12 countries and ranked them in of who viewed america favorably. even if the u.s. is wanted to mind its own business on many issues, that is not a rally cry for isolationism. 77% say it is a good thing for the u.s. to have more involvement in the global economy. >> for more on the fascinating findings come i spoke a
was in american foreign policy. it really was like murder incorporated. the destruction of iraq, the creation of the cia black sites, the idea that the geneva convention was -- [inaudible] the abu ghraib torture, using guantanamo, you could go on and on in characterizing it. so i don't want to get into a thing about is obama worse than bush. i covered those wars, i know what happened. under president obama i think what we have is someone who has sort of rebranded some of the more egregious aspects of the bush-cheney counterterror apparatus and i think has convinced himself that they're waging a smarter war. so they're relying on the drones much more than the bush administration did, using small team of coovert operators to conduct either kill or capture, and because guantanamo remains open despite the president's pledge to close it during his anytime office, i think that the obama administration doesn't want to capture too many people. so the kill-capture program has generally become a kill program. and so at the end of the day, i think the enduring legacy for president obama on the issues i
so much. president obama in his typical foreign-policy challenges are being magnified by recent events in afghanistan. president hamid karzai refuses to sign a security agreement with the united states that would define american military presence in his country at the end of the year. but he did agree to a new agreement with iran. he agreed in principle to a friendship and cooperation path dealing with security and economic issues and within hours of that agreement, he was also already calling for the removal of american forces from the area. he said that we believe that all foreign forces should leave the region and the security of afghanistan should be handed over to people of the country. the so-called moderate has aalowed executions to surge since he took office, with more than 300 people executed since just the month of august. iran is the leader in executions. president obama and other dignitaries are on their way to south africa to attend tomorrow's memorial service from nelson mandela. hitching a ride on air force one with the president and michele obama, former presiden
pockets. china and egypt at the same foreign policies toward the pressing issues and amenities. both have been working to push forward a two state solution for the palestinian israeli conflict base of the nineteen sixty seven borders and they support a political solution for this are in crisis the look. she had the time she will walk in with goals he resigns to peaceful solution. the results you email it to accomplish. no one will win. the serum people would suffer a loss both the opposition the government to cdm in geneva to implement the resolutions of june you will want oh emphasize on china's bizarre to expand the already increasing exports to egypt. but twelve economic ties are strengthening. some analysts believe the current buyback or religions are not satisfactory. would it didn't cost us three dollars due respect to china supports all you have all of the time that's variations does not see that the star of the ties between the two nations. we asked the owner looking forward to morning mass demands more terrorists egypt is now revising these foreign policy and upstream from the ti
with a different type of foreign policy, a different approach of foreign policy. our tenant versus nos have not . he will insist on our rights. we will not compromise on the basic rights of our people. but the window of opportunity is a limited window. >> that was with iran's foreign minister. >>> alan gross was in north korea working on an internet project fo--incuba working on a. government. he was detained. libby casey has his story. >> alan gross' wife judy describes him as a man who wanted to help the world. >> he was very gregarious, very happy person, great personality, very, very warm. unfortunately, that's changed quite a bit in the past four years. people don't recognize him when they see pictures of him. >> decades of humanitarian work across the globe led the 60-year-old to cuba, the goal, setting up internet access for cuba's small jewish communities. now he languished in a jail cell. he has lost weight, his help, he feels like he has been forgotten and left to die. >> what could be worse than thinking your government isn't doing anything to bring you home. >> reporter: support
a diplomatic one. or as it was described to me at the time, we want to demilitarize our foreign policy, and you had a very forward-leaning point of view as it was perceived whereas hagel was seen as of a different view. first of all, is this assessment at all accurate? and second, what's happened in the ensuing months in terms of where they have gone on policies from iran to afghanistan as we were just discussing, does that, in fact, reflect this far more diplomatic and less military aapproach? >> i, i don't have a window into the president's decision making, but i, your explanation does not ring true to me, to my ears. i think chuck hagel has been close associate of president obama's since their time in the senate. of he served on the president's intelligence advisory board. i think there was a lot of discussion in the first term about finding a place for chuck hagel in the president's cabinet, and i think that that, you know, that discussion was naturally renewed when there was an opportunity to bring new people into the cabinet in the second term. so i think that is the president's, you know
you think, share your thoughts on obama foreign policy with other fox news sundayviewers on twitter at sundayviewers on twitter at #fns. this is the quicksilver cash back card from capil one. it's not the "limit the cash i earnvery month" card. it's not the "i only earn decent rewards at the gas station" card. it's the no-games, no-signing up, everyday-rewarding, kung-fu-fighting, silver-lightning-in-a-bottle, bringing-home-the-bacon cash back card. this is the quicksilver card from capital one. unlimited 1.5% cash back on eve purchase, everywhere, every single day. so ask yourself, what's in your wallet? >>> critics in this country and the middle east continue to question the nuclear deal the u.s. and its allies worked out with iran. and there is increasing concern about the new air defense zone that china has declared over disputed territory in the east china sea. joining me now to discuss this and more, former cia and nsa director michael hayden, and, general, welcome back to "fox news sunday." >> good morning, chris. >> do you look at the new six-month deal with iran as a rea
story. >>> we're going to come back with our roundtable. we'll talk a little about foreign policy, the challenges facing the u.s. overseas at the moment. iran, afghanistan just this . >>> here now, some of this week's images to remember. >>> i did love the guy on twitter pour me coffee who wrote, good job today, sports. >> i'm still shell shocked. >> we're not talking about any more reports because we're running out of time. but you're here with first read sunday. a lot to look forward to in the week ahead. surely they can get a budget deal with everything going so well on health care. >> on december 13, house republican paul ryan when it comes to the budget, nancy pelosi, they have to come up with a top line number that they're agreeing to saying in order to avoid a shutdown in january. remember, we ran out of funding in january, so december 13 is when they have to come up with this line, and i don't want to get into sequester and all these issues, but it has come to just this very small agreement. i think they will. democrats have a little leverage here, david, because republica
foreign policy, the challenges facing the u.s. overseas at the moment. iran, afghanistan just this weekend opportunities aren't always obvious. sometimes they just drop in. cme group can help you navigate risks and capture opportunities. we enable you to reach global markets and drive forward with broader possibilities. cme group: how the world advances. maestro of project management. baron of the build-out. you need a permit... to be this awesome. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. (aaron) purrrfect. (vo) meee-ow, business pro. meee-ow. go national. go like a pro. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportuni
under president obama. bill: 54-56% disapprove to how the president is handling foreign policy. 2/3 in that pew survey believe americans view greater involvement in the global economy is a greater thing. meaning when america is a strong country it's better for the world. >> we have seen that throughout history. and when we see economies like china coming up it's important to have our own economy keep going. people like to complain about america, but when something happens in the world, the philippines, the typhoon there, when something happens in the world guess who is the first country to go, the united states military and the charities. we are divide as a country on political lines. republicans and democrats are split on how they see our influence in the world. the democrats believe the president has broken his promises. he said we would leave iraq, afghanistan and close guantanamo bay. republicans are saying don't be apologizing for guantanamo bay when you are on foreign tour. bill: what do you think the apology tour did to our view of ourselves in the world? >> when you have t
time to sort out his hand at growing foreign debt and work out how to fund a modernization program. it declared this would have helped save cold chills the fourth and did it to amy deal with the eu. but foreign policy analysts from a concussion in a cover of things the eu would let ukraine poll fit from europe's economy. this european union officials and heads of european states tried to explain the advantages of european ambition to lead opinions too late the main even if you are ukrainian products that will be able to penetrate the european market. he's only one explanation for that to me that it would be none indeed the philippine market he's nice and very protected markets. and it is actually the ukrainian market that's your real needs particularly in big time golf in economic crisis has so it is said to please you as an extension called the european market will the protests is was impressed by the ukraian president's promise to re start discussions on the eu trade deal which of course lies at the root of all the unrest has taken a bit of a situation has unfolded over the pos c
in recent years. 51% say the president is not tough enough in his approach to foreign policy. ! you how one organization is playing this story on the pew study. you can get the details on the al jazeera met -- on the al jazeera website. then there is this based on your survey, 70% of those surveyed said the u.s. command less respect than it did in the past, matching little scene toward the end of president george w. bush's second term. that was something that was also surprising to us because we also conduct our global attitude studies all over the world. the image of the united states is negative all end ofe world by the george w. bush presidency, then at that .70% of americans say the u.s. was less respected around the world than it has been in the past. when barack obama came into office, we know that around the world u.s. relations improved. about 56% say this was the case in 2009 and in 2012. today it is back to 70%. likely --s are more in the credits have not changed it is not just partisanship driving. but there was a partisanship story there. host: what do we gather from all of that
foreign-policy initiatives that i have not attacked him and tried to be supportive of him on. on the drug issues, it has taken him a while, but he is now doing something about some of the mandatory minimums. on infrastructure, there is a way that we could have more infrastructure money -- it is all the money earned overseas by american corporations, nearly $2 trillion from them, could be brought home. tax it at 5%, and probably hundreds of billions of dollars in money comes home, but just in tax revenue, at 5%, you would doubled the money we have available for infrastructure and if we could just tax it at 5%. it is a win-win solution. we lower the tax rate. we get more revenue and we built some roads. and i talked to the president about that, and the president said this cbo score is a loss of revenue because it is not coming in at 35%. 0% is coming home. we have to overcome the cbo score on this. i said, we vote to overturn all the other rules, let's vote to overturn this one. there is a chance we could pass that. there's more of a chance that we could pass that than overall tax reform, w
and economic assistance. other tools of former -- foreign policy. the state department budget is puny in comparison to the defense budget. you get an awful lot of benefit from some of those investments that the state department, in terms of assistance, economic assistance and it is that part of the category of the budget where we have had a lot less success in getting bipartisan support. moree senate, we have bipartisan support for that. lindsey graham, john mccain, they have been big supporters of a robust state department budget. house, some of our colleagues on the republican -- broadlyially defined as the tea party folks, it has been difficult trying to convince them of the important national security arguments in favor of that form of assistance. this is a constant back-and- forth. if you look at the house republican budget over the ten- year period, it would cut the category of the budget for those kind of state department operations. we going to have to work together to try and prevent it. if you want to do the kinds of things that mike rogers wants to do and i agree with most
in foreign policy. we don't get to choose our partners and we end up having to do business with lots of odeus regimes we may not like because they have things that we need. and so that involves tradeoffs between -- and those tradeoffs involve clashes between our interests, what we need, what we need to keep the world safe, and our values, things like human rights, democracy, caring about corruption, et cetera. and those tradeoffs are hard to make. sometimes we have to choose one rather than the other. >> specifically on afghanistan, it looks like what we're paying for is control and some influence in a part of the world where we need more of it. $13 billion a year is a lot of coin. >> it ills but this is -- part of the story with afghanistan, you break it, you own it. we invaded and tried too build up. we're spending a lot of money now trying to build up an afghan was so when we leave we don't there before we came in. and so it opportunity become a base for al qaeda or other international terrorist. >> i know that's what we're trying to do. whether we are we're gifting there is another matter
. more than half of americans also don't like the way he is handling foreign policy. immigration and the economy. the data now raising concerns over what can still be accomplished in his next few years as president. joining us now is our political panel angela mcgrewen, fox knew political analyst, and ronow molono. the president used to enjoy euphoric ratings. now his approval rating is abysmal on all kinds of issues. so ways happening overall? why is this happening? what kind of take do you look at this -- what prism do you look at this through, angela? >> the bottom line is this. are you better off today than you were four years ago? most americans that elected this president yet again, now they're having buyers remorse, because most americans are not better off. if you look at the unemployment rate at 7% but for the black community, last check, it was 13%. the hispanic community has not lowered that much and for women and young adults, if you have a college degree, kelly, most people don't have a job today, so people are looking at this situation and though the president is a
country. when he came to power, many wondered how he would steer the new country's foreign policy. after all the african national congress which he headed had been supported by the revolutionaries of the world. gadhafi, arafat, castro, but mandela knew what countries were in his best interests. he steered nit a pro democratic, pro western -- honoring his old comrades, never forgetting their support. his final act of greatness was leaving office. very few black african leaders had ever left office voluntarily in 1999 when nelson mandela did after just one term. he wanted to make sure that south african democracy didn't descend so -- he was in this sense south africa's george washington, as much as one man can shape's a country future, nelson mandela did it for south africa. and in doing so, he also shaped the consciousness of the entire world. let's get started. >>> let's go live to johannsberg to cnn's robin kernao. she joins us from outside his home in johannsberg, robin, there's a lot of talk about prayer and reflection. today's the day of prayer and reflection. there's lots of religi
. >> interestingly, on the political front, we know of course that the eu foreign policy chief, katherine ashton is due to arrive on tuesday. what doo does this signify? >> authorities show their strength on monday. but it is ahead of the possibility at least of further negotiation. and coincidentally, we heard the president yanukovych who, of course, these protestors want out and new elections taking place, has offered the possibility of talks. the opposition initially have said, we're not prepared to talk. when we're hemmed in by your riot police. but i think with katherine ashton's arrival, there is a possibility, at least account, that the -- at least, that the warg factions in this dispute might move towards talking to each other. that will certainly be her aim. and it's also, i think, although one can never be sure about these things, that while she is here, perhaps the authorities will not move against the protestors who are still camped out here, as we were saying, and also occupying city hall. >> they are camped out in what are freezing conditions. it's been snowing there for most of th
of the agenda at their own national security foreign policy interest. if this is good for russia, they will be at the table. that is a double edged sword. it can be a great way to solve some problems across the middle east, but we need to be extremely cautious of setting the table but so any agreement or arrangement with the russians also protects u.s., our allies interests in the region as well. the assad -- if you look at the tenets of the chemical agreement, great we got some chemical weapons off, but the russians cleaned up on us on exactly what they got in that particular field. and because of that we alienated our allies in the region. that is an important component. i am for getting that deal, but we are paying a price for that deal, but not only including the allies in negotiating that deal. >> let's consider this conversation on syria. we you were a sponsor in the summer of the free syria act, a bill to provide arms and support to the syrian rebels. when we interviewed the representative, he said he was pleased to have your co- sponsorship of the bill, a bipartisan effor
-un is still not ready to meet anybody that has some substance, foreign policy background. he hasn't done that with the chinese. he hasn't done it with south koreans. again, it shows that he is probably right now spending his time consolidating his power, and he's replaced various generals from the old guard, keeping control of the military, the communist party. but what is so interesting is how publicly he humiliated his uncle in talking about his ouster. that they went out of their way to show that this was a very visible ouster. and i have never seen that done in north korea before with his father. they ousted people, but it was done on a more quiet basis. >> if dennis rodman leaves north korea with kenneth bay, the american sentenced to a long term, a prison sentence for apparently doing some missionary work, supposedly, in north korea, that would be encouraging to get the other american out, and dennis rodman would be praised if he were to leave together with kenneth bay, right? >> that's right. and rodman should concentrate on doing that. i don't think rodman takes my advice very we
to our foreign policy series discussion on the recently signed interim agreement between iran and the p5 plus germany and geneva. we have gathered a distinguished panel of experts who will walk us through what just happened and what may lie ahead. headlines during the last 48 hours have run the entire spectrum from victory for iran obamastoric mistake to achieves historic measure. most comments have followed what has become a redeemable republican/democrat divide, but recent polls indicate that nearly 2/3 of all americans support an agreement with iran at would lift sanctions for iran in return for tehran restricting its nuclear program. what is undeniable is that there are many layers to this cake, and we look forward to hearing from our panelists as they discuss whether the agreement brings new hope for nuclear negotiations with iran or further disappointment. our panelists are no strangers to the world affairs council audiences. we welcome back all three. ambassador john bloomberg is professor at the united -- professor of international affairs at the united states naval academy -- am
of for the healthcare.gov. should he fire someone? on foreign policy, a tweet -- he will be up on capitol hill to testify about that. there are headlines about that deal. the financial times this morning. is in chinasident and has met with japanese leaders as well. dianne feinstein and robert --endez vice president biden meeting on with asian leaders. we are talking about healthcare.gov. it somebody be fired over its failures? pennsylvania. republican. caller: good morning. i feel that the obama care fiasco has been ruining many people. my son, for instance. 62 years old -- he signed up for security and about two days later he got a letter that he had no more insurance. this is wrong. it is happening to everybody. the insurance companies must be relishing this problem. i think he is wrong and they do that he talks on both sides of his mouth. he tells us one thing and he knows he is going to do something else. i think he has been so unfair to a lot of the american public. i don't think he knows the constitution -- he does not believe in it. i am just so sorry for my son and my other children. i
there? >> well i think this is the making or breaking of the obama presidency in terms of foreign policy. so, the next six months are going to be absolutely crucial. it's a temporary agreement and there's going to be a question of whether iran can be trusted and take tot the next stage. >> what about afghanistan? many of us in this country expect over the next 12 months or so, that would effectively end or a deal to keep some troops on. when america leaves what will that mean for the country? >> there needs deal. it's a bad thing president karzai is playing politics with this and not getting on and doing it. it is crucial. there's an election in afghanistan next year. the question will be is there enough credibility in that election to keep the security situation under control and it will require some continued presence of american forces there. >> you mentioned china and perhaps the continued slow down on the chinese economy but we're seeing think it week, a rise in regional tensions driven by chinese nationalism over this disputed set of islands. what happens in that region in terms of
: >> on the next washington journal the foreign-policy initiative discussing secretary of state john kerry's tenure so far in the overall foreign policy challenges that the obama administration faces. after that, the center for public integrity talking about financial disclosure requirements for state supreme court judges. then, a discussion about genetically modified foods with new york university professor mary ann nestle. it will also look for your reaction, as always, by phone, e-mail, and twitter. live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the white house has president obama and the first lady will go to south africa next week to pay their respects to the memory of the late nelson mandela. also on friday, former secretary of state hillary clinton talked about the former south african president's legacy. here is some of what she said. >> we meet on that day after the loss of a giant among us, someone who, by the power of his example, demonstrated that unequivocally how each of us can choose how we will respond to those in justice's and grievances, those sorrows and tragedy's that afflict
came during a foreign policy conversation at a washington think tank forum. nbc's kristen welker is live for us at the white house. kristen, did the president successfully sell his deal today? >> reporter: well, craig, i think that remains to be seen. but that is what he was doing. he was trying to sell this deal to the skeptics here in the united states, but also to israelis, a lot of israeli journalists in the audience there today. if you look at the polls inside israel, a lot of folks don't like this deal. so president obama trying to convince them of the merits of this deal, making the point that, look, it is a test. it's a six-month freeze of iran's nuclear program that will be tested by inspectors who will go into the country and determine their level of seriousness. he also made the point that of the $100 billion worth of sanctions, this scales back about $7 billion of those, leaving the main sanctions in place. here's a little bit more of what he had to say this afternoon. take a listen. >> if we could create an option in which iran eliminated every single nut and bolt of
necessary for our folks. >> did you have a question? >> thank you. i am a fellow at the foreign policy institute here at sais. you mentioned one common interest the united states has with russia and syria is to prevent syria from becoming a base of operations for al qaeda. once we start changing the border regime in that part of the world, we are in for changes that will have many repercussions. my question is as follows -- do you foresee in the medium-term, scenario where we see assad staying in power as being instrumental in that we share with the russians. > i think the american position, which i support, has been that you had, in syria, at he beginning of the arab spring, a movement that represented the aspirations of the majority of the syrian people across the secretary and lines for more openness and hange. the assad regime is a brutal regime that suppresses the rights of the people. e need to change the regime in syria. the challenge has been -- from our perspective we think be syrian the people deserve a government, one that represents their aspirations. we need to make sure t
important tools of foreign-policy which as secretary gates and other secretaries of defense have made clear, the state department budget is unique in comparison with the defense budget but again an awful lot of benefit from some of those state department both in terms of assistance, economic assistance and other forms of assistance and it's that part of the category of the budget where we have had a lot less success in getting bipartisan support. although i would say in the senate we have more, much more bipartisan support so for example senator lindsey graham and senator john mccain have been very big supporters of a robust state department budget as well. but in the house certainly some of our colleagues on the public inside a specially broadly defined as the tea party folks, i mean they have got, it's been really difficult trying to convince them of the important national security arguments in favor of that assistance. but again this is a constant back-and-forth and if you look at the house republican budget over the ten-year period it dramatically dramatically, it would dramatically cut
budget deal and number of challenging foreign policy issues. >> difficult for commuters in washington. snow, ice, rain has millions slipping and slide ago long the northeast coast. >> drivers from new york city to boston face the fine line between rain and freezing rain. this storm stretches from alabama all the way through new england. the philadelphia area has been especially hard hit. jenn of our philadelphia station kyw is in nearby brenmar. >> reporter: we were supposed to get a few inches yesterday. by mid afternoon we found ourselves in the middle of a full blown snowstorm. snow covered roads proved deadly after a driver was struck and killed after he got out of his car after a minor crash. the 50 car pileup left dozens stranded for hours on the turnpike. across the state, the storm's power took many by surprise. >> the storm came out of nowhere. it just hit us. >> reporter: drivers found themselves spinning out or maneuvering vehicles on foot. at philadelphia international airport, more than eight and a half inches of snow fell forcing the ground stop for fl
not support apartheid. >> talk about how nelson mandela influenced foreign state policy. >> an interesting thing is nelson mandela did not abandon friends. there's something i know, clinton talked about, he disagreed with nelson mandela on the issue of cuba and his relationship with fidel castro. nelson mandela did not forget his friends. they stood with him. making sure countries in africa could stand together and do what was in the best interests of their people, may not necessarily benefit all. all people around the planet knew that it is possible, that you can make the impossible possible. and that is what happened, and that is, to me, what his life embodied. >> that is why the world is remembering nelson mandela. >> thank you for your time today. >> thank you. >> today egyptian authorities released 21 women and girls sent to prison for protesting. they had been ordered to spend 11 years behind bars, but it caused widespread outrage. >> in syria new developments about a group of nuns in the hands of rebels. the human rights organization said they were taken after they overran a busines
the significant nature of the shift in american foreign policy that we are seeing laid out before us . i would be honored to recognize my colleague and friend, the gentleman from california, mr. sherman. mr. sherman: i thank the gentleman for yielding. the political pund its are focused on -- pund its, are focused on was this a good deal or a bad deal. we aren't here to give a grade to the administration. we are here in congress to decide what legislation should be passed. congress is a policy-making body, although so often those in the administration think that we are, at most, advisers or critics. but let's take a look at this deal and we'll see that what we get out of it is at least overstated by its proponents. because we are told that this halts their enrichment of uranium. it is true that it limits their 20% uranium. and iran will not be making progress during the six-month period of this deal toward its first bomb. but they will be making very substantial progress toward their eighth, ninth and tenth bomb and iran is not a nuclear power until they have some to hide, one to two to test.
of one of obama's hidden foreign policy initiatives over the past five years. he is had secret negotiations me, the israelis, excuse with the radians, and we have seen him at the same time alienate many of our allies in the media it's -- in the mideast. doesn't this act is a clever ploy to keep the israelis from attacking and defending their own national interest -- >> the secret meetings with iranians, where'd you get that from? caller: that was in the press this past week. nott: the meetings have .een anything but on the p5+1 what you're talking about now is making sure and verifying, the whole idea was for iran to not having nuclear weapons. if we had gone in this manner before with iraq, where we railroad -- were able to go and massy no weapons of instruction there, let defectors go where they want unfettered, then maybe we would have been able to avoid the thousands of , thecan lives that we lost devastation to our economy that we had. cy as go, give diplomas chance. if in fact around does not live up to the agreement, we have 20 of time and the ability to do -- toings, to
's much of a description of his foreign policy. but congress has lots of power if he chooses to use. the power of the purse is an enormous power, and i think if i were you, i would find ways to influence policy using the congress' powers, which were not doing. for example, we are hearing complaints about the president's actions do not enforce deportation against a certain classes of immigrants. you know, instead of complaining about that, this committee could hold a markup and report of a comprehensive immigration reform bill, send it to the for -- >> mr. lazarus, you are -- not you but the question is too inept minutes over. so you can do this by giving us advice of what our legislative agenda should lock like an answer the question, i would be grateful to you. >> that is an answer. i think on this has a lot of power and it should use it. >> and i assume that the failure to exercise is also an exercise of power. the failure to act. mr. cannon, would you like to briefly -- >> maybe mr. lazarus knows better than i do how many bombs the president has dropped before that becomes more.
from georgetown university, was a chief foreign policy adviser for the majority leader of the senate, senator daschle, that's were i met den denis. then the deputy national street adviser in the white house and the chief of staff for the president of the united states. please welcome denis mcdonough. [applause] >> angood morning and let me sa, let me say thanks to georgetown university and arent fox from this form on the affordable care act. let me say thanks to the great sin of the northern flank, senator dorgan answered daschle. senator daschle has been a very important mentor to me for the opportunity to be here. senator bennet, good to see you again as well. i appreciate the opportunity to talk about the affordable care act, what it's done and what it will do. and i want to update you this point on the progress we've made on fixing the website, affordable carhealthcare.gov. before talk about the law and its benefits, let me just take about to visit i made to the emergency room on a friday night recently. with one of my boys after he broke his left arm. they care was excellent, as
approach to foreign policy. netanyahu has said recently, rouhani has an iron fist sheathed by a velvet glove. rouhani was a nuclear negotiator, and he even bragged that he had used at the cover to advance iran's nuclear efforts. while he may be president, he is not the supreme leader, which is khamenei. the guy who at the end of the day really controls the shots is ali khamenei. rouhani was chosen by a special, very small group that khamenei had picked. they chose acceptable candidates within a narrow band of political thought. i think people do, people i work with look forward to the day when people in iran have a genuine choice between alternatives politically, but they are a long way from it. to your point, in terms of how much wiggle room rouhani has, the iranians have two big goals. >> you can watch the rest of this online at the c-span video library. we will move onto the willard hotel for remarks by secretary of state on kerry at the brookings institution save and -- brookingsisrael forum onon save anban u.s.-israel relations. >> thank you for the generous introduction and for t
the level of dizzy content among low paid foreign workers in this strictly governed city-state. comarls stratford,-- charles stratford, al jazeera. >>> next on al jazeera, we'll talk to a man who witnessed mandela's policies firsthand. the man known only as madiba. >> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm del walters. time is ticking for congress. on a laundry list of items. including that new spending bill. the bill would avoid another government shutdown. the house is scheduled to close for christmas on friday. >>> central african republic, african force he will be air lifted by american forces, they will also air lift equipment into that country. sectarian violence has engulfed the central african republic since march. >>> preparations for nelson mandela's funeral are taking place in kunu, scheduled to stay place on sunday. >>> as the world leaders gather in south africa, many have extraordinary stories to share about nelson mandela. earlier, i talked to the former ambassador to south africa, delano lewis. first of all, your reflections back on the man. >> well the reflections i mu
to stay home forever home forever and be vacated as a bartender while your parents paid 80,000 foreign education. that is the reality that the me millennial space. and no matter what people want to call obama or his policies if you don't see upward mobility, you can't have it on the watergate the boy or girl you want to build something for your own future if you want a family. that is reality for millennialist. >> politically it is interesting. there's a great cause of concern because obama won this group by massive majority and they thought that because he could relate to them, that they would be able to lock in this generation is a durable democratic voting majority going into the future. because if you could get them young, that is a part of their identity for the rest of their lives. these numbers is crushing these kids dreams. lou: the gap is larger across the entire force. >> one other thing that i think that the millennialist are is stupid and we can characterize this. but i don't think they are, i think they have caught on, and they have seen that there is no future and there i
-amnesty groups, at helping foreigners stay in the united states. now that they're at dhs, they can impose these ideas, these ideologies, these policies regardless of what congress does or does not do. >> we've got some of the details. you had written a column on this and you detailed each of them. michael salo in, and others. because everybody has got a very detailed biography, how would you summarize these people? >> they're all on the far left open border side of the equation. look at jennifer lee. when she was at a pro-open borders group, they actually published a pamphlet titled "what to do in the event of a raid." it was given to illegal aliens to help them if they were raided. look at morera wee. she wrote articles attacking dhs before she went to work for dhs because dhs, she was gathering fingerprint data from people they caught crossing the border so they couldn't keep doing it over and over again. she was against that. it's crazy stuff and now they're in the government enforcing immigration law. >> unlike a politician, politicians can get elected out of office. booted out by the
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